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Category: Chief Justice’s Blog

The Triple Aim: A cross-sector vision

This morning, A2JBC was proud to issue a media release advising that more than 50 justice sector organizations have signed onto the Access to Justice Triple Aim. The Triple Aim, borrowed from the health care sector, is a single goal with three elements: improved experience for the users of the justice system, improved population access […]

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“It’s the economy, stupid”

[This blog post was previously published on The Access Revolution, a collaborative blog hosted by Dr. Julie Macfarlane and the National Self-Represented Litigants Project.] Sorry for the pejorative. It’s me quoting Professor Gillian Hadfield quoting James Carville, who famously advised Bill Clinton to focus on the economy during his 1992 presidential campaign. Gillian Hadfield is […]

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Is the justice system ready to innovate?

On November 20, 2018, A2JBC’s Leadership Group convened at the Telus Innovation Centre for a stimulating day of conversation about opportunities for innovation in the justice system. To start, we heard how artificial intelligence can assist BC doctors and patients with triage and support, improving both groups’ experience of the system. Next, we heard from […]

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Understanding the value of alternative dispute resolution

The Canadian Forum on Civil Justice recently released a report evaluating different dispute resolution methods in family law matters. The report was based on a survey that asked family lawyers for their views on the usefulness of collaborative settlement processes, mediation, arbitration and litigation to resolve family law disputes. The results indicated that family lawyers […]

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Self-help success stories

Visitors to our website will know that many individuals in BC have difficulty affording a lawyer and end up representing themselves in Court when they have a legal dispute. A2JBC supports various innovations that seek to reduce the barriers that prevent individuals from accessing counsel, but some ideas, like the unbundling initiative, are also aimed […]

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Access to justice for children and youth

Last week I had the opportunity to meet with lawyers from the Child and Youth Legal Centre, launched earlier this fall. Donna Maser, managing lawyer, and Suzette Narbonne, child and youth lawyer, described the Centre’s mandate: to advance the legal rights of children and youth in order to improve their well-being in British Columbia. Children […]

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Innovation in action

Canadian Lawyer magazine recently published two stories about the Aspire Legal Access Initiative (“Aspire”), an initiative which I think represents the type of innovation A2JBC encourages. Aspire seeks to empower self-represented clients dealing with family law matters to navigate the system themselves with the support of affordable, limited scope services. Aspire’s model relies primarily on […]

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Engaging the legal profession: the BC Paralegal Association

I recently had the pleasure of speaking to the BC Paralegal Association Annual Fall Dinner on the access to justice challenges we face in our province. I was impressed to learn about the significant growth in membership of the BCPA, and to see so many paralegals coming together to celebrate their success and demonstrate their […]

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Launch of A2JBC’s new website

I am pleased to announce the launch of Access to Justice BC’s new website. The previous website was acting as a placeholder until we were better equipped to put together a site that would be more user-friendly, informative and interactive. Thanks to the contributions of many organizations and individuals, Access to Justice BC has been […]

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The Law Society’s role regarding public access to legal services

A recurring access to justice discussion has concerned the role of law societies in meeting the legal needs of the public. The Winter 2016 CBA National Magazine contains an article (“Should lawyers have a monopoly over the provision of legal services?”) arguing that lawyers are not meeting the public’s need for legal services, and that […]

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